Tag Archives: reporting

Rally ‘Round The Gadsden: A Meeting Of Upstate New York Secessionists

Vice News expressed interest in coverage of an Upstate New York secession rally, held on Sunday, August 30 in Bainbridge – a lovely little village on the Susquehanna about halfway between Binghamton and Oneonta. So I went, and wrote the story pretty “straight” on Monday morning, as was requested, and it must’ve been too straight, or something, because it was killed. There were a couple TV reports from the rally, but this is the only “print” report so far as I can tell.

If, someday, the state of New York decides to get a legal divorce, whatever government or revolutionary committee is operating in Chenango County will have to spring for a historical marker in the village of Bainbridge.

The first “Secession Movement Rally” was held there on Sunday, Aug. 30, in General Clinton Park on the banks of the Susquehanna River. Southern Tier landowner groups who want to allow fracking have proposed joining Pennsylvania, a story that made news this past February. Another proposal pitched by the “Divide New York State Caucus” calls for a two-region “autonomous zone” that separates the city and Downstate from Upstate. Regional governments would do most of the legislating – the new one region is to be called “New Amsterdam” – with the state governor retaining “no more power than the Queen of England,” according to caucus chair John Bergener, Jr.

Bainbridge Rally Cuomo Must Go
The nitty-gritty business of how to secede was discussed some during the rally, but the majority of the 11 speakers throughout the nearly three-hour event focused on why they have problems with living in Upstate New York. Burdensome regulations – on guns, gas, and schools – figured prominently in the litany of woes, as did Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s existence. Safety-green T-shirts with “CUOMO MUST GO” on the back and a handful of red “Yes, I Can Say Windsor, Pennsylvania” were dotted throughout a crowd that peaked at about 150, though it dwindled to perhaps half that by the end. They mingled under a row of pop-up tents sheltering tables loaded with literature on too-high taxes, unconstitutional gun control, jury nullification, and how to frack safely.

Dan Devlin, of the New York Oath Keepers, began the proceedings by decrying New York’s SAFE Act, the state gun control law passed in 2013. The greatest injustice, Devlin said, is the state’s mistrust of those who served in the military or police.

“You have to go to the state or county and say, please, may I have a firearm,” Devlin said. He called for men to stand up and defend their rights and the rights of those scarred by war. “I can tell you of people who lost arms and legs and their sanity and sight because they believed you’d take care of the country they left you.”

Devlin made clear his position on whether he feels the Constitution is actually in effect when the next speaker asked him to lead the Pledge of Allegiance and he called for someone else to do that duty.
“Are there any veterans in the crowd who would like to lead this pledge?” Devlin asked. “It’s a pretty important thing to decline to do this … Until people know what they’re taking the pledge to, I’ll decline on occasion.”

Upstate Secession Bainbridge
Several horror stories of “American heroes” screwed over by stringent gun laws were told by Steve Aldstadt of SCOPE, including one about an Iraq and Afghanistan veteran who “had a few rifles with the pistol grip on them, the scary kind,” that he needed to sell to make ends meet. After visiting a dealer with these guns, which Aldstadt said were legal in other states, the veteran was reported to “the feds.” They posed as a gun buyer and are now charging the veteran with felonies.

“They’re making good, honest people into criminals,” Aldstadt said, before closing his piece with a shout of “Andrew Cuomo, let my people go!”

The “New York 2nd Amendment Grassroots Coalition,” or NY2A for short, was handing out postcards with four emphases listed – education, voter registration, nullification, and non-compliance. REGISTER NOTHING the card said, in government-stamp font, alongside a picture of four men feeding papers into a lit kettle grill.

Jake Palmateer of NY2A told his story of New York’s Sullivan Act, a concealed weapons law passed in 1911. The sponsoring state senator, Tim Sullivan, was “suffering from syphilis, he was crazy,” Palmateer said. To boot, the law was “born out of ethnophobia” – the Irish didn’t want Italians to have handguns. This led into a mention of the National Rifle Association helping to arm Southern blacks against the KKK during Reconstruction.

Secede! Upstate Secession - Bainbridge

 

Freeing gas from the ground after New York’s statewide fracking ban was also a popular talking point.

Vic Furman said he was watching his grandchildren play in the yard the morning of the rally and was wondering how their lives would turn out.

“They’re going to have people like Yoko Ono telling them how to live their life, while flying around in jets,” Furman said, referring to Ono’s Pennsylvania tours with Gasland director Josh Fox. “We have to get these assholes in Albany out,” Furman concluded.

Sandra Davis, of the Deposit Gas Group, had her own big closing line after she talked about gas drilling benefiting everyone: “It’s all well and good to save the whales. Let’s save our young families, too.”

And Jane Stebela, of Americans for Restoring the Constitution, read a Jeffersonian declaration of secession, which started its litany of grievances with this: “Property Rights is the Cornerstone of our Freedom and our potential Wealth. This Right has been usurped by the Royal Governor and his Activist Minions by restricting the opportunity of extracting precious minerals provided by the Infallible Creator himself. Surely God had no plan to harm us with the bountiful Natural Resources provided for our consumption.”

Common Core requirements and testing came up for criticism. Cathy Sapeta, of New Yorkers United For Kids, told the crowd that the new education requirements are “not about education, it’s about control and money.”

“’It’s going to take about 10 years to see if this education stuff works,’” Sapeta said she had read in an interview with Bill Gates, “the biggest sponsor” of Common Core. “They tell you it’s about education, but it’s about sorting children.”

Gilda Ward, of a local Tea Party group, expressed the most wide-ranging frustration. She told of her son having to leave the state to find a job, and talked about Upstate towns that “look more like inner-city Detroit.” Cuomo is all about control, Ward said, citing the “Upstate New York Economic Revitalization Competition,” the governor’s initiative to fund three $500 million proposals from seven different regions from financial crisis settlement monies.

“Again, we have to have a contest,” Ward said, “for these public-private partnerships that don’t have much to do with the needs of the people. They call it the upstate Hunger Games. Isn’t that lovely?”

Bergener said in a phone interview that much of his motivation for working with the Divide New York caucus the past seven years is also frustration that his own children and friends’ kids have had to move out-of-state to find jobs. Bergener acknowledged that a new region without Downstate’s tax revenues would have less state income, but it “wouldn’t be a super-poor place.” One of the things the “token state government” would still take care of through some taxation power, Bergener said, is outstanding pension obligations – “one of the most expensive things.”

“The current regulations are destroying everything,” Bergener said. Since no Congressional approval is needed for the New Amsterdam plan, two separate regions is realistic, he believes.

“Once people accept that it’s a workable plan, it’s getting people to believe it could actually happen,” Bergener said. That will require voters saying yes to the every-20-years ballot question of “should New York have a constitutional convention?” in 2017 – and then sending delegates to that convention who will work for regional autonomy.

Palmateer told the ralliers that the idea for secession has come “from strange places before” – that is, New York City. He cited Norman Mailer and Anthony Weiner’s mayoral campaigns and said that the city’s support will definitely be needed if any sort of secession plan can happen.

“We won’t get anywhere without the support of New York City,” Palmateer said. “They get to keep their lifestyle, and we get to live free. Or freer.”

Josh Brokaw is a writer currently based in Ithaca, N.Y. Direct critiques, communiques, and cash to jaydbrokaw at gmail.com

Cornell Protesters Don’t Like Getting Investigated

Originally published in the Ithaca Times on May 6. This is my original draft.

In the week before Cornell’s big Charter Day celebration the weekend of April 24-27, several students active in “#FightTheFee” protests were called in to speak with administrators, or, in two cases, with Cornell police investigator Justin Baum. The student organizers, who had staged two protests during spring 2015 against the university’s proposed $350 health care fee for those not enrolled in Cornell insurance, say the irony of these conversations is that they had nothing scheduled for Charter Day events at all.

“We’re not nearly as cool as they think we are,” said Alex Brown, a Ph.D student in German studies, before Charter Day weekend.

“We anticipate that you will use (Charter Day) as an opportunity to continue your protests,” vice president Susan Murphy wrote students Wyatt Nelson and Michael Ferrer on April 19 in an email requesting a meeting, “and want to discuss with you what we expect to happen over the course of the weekend.”

What did end up happening over Charter Day weekend was an April 26 demonstration announcing the formation of the “Cornell Independent Students’ Union” – an entity organizers say is unrelated to #FightTheFee, though several people are involved in both. That gathering of about 60 students was held outdoors, where protests do not need approval under campus rules.

Where students and faculty say the administration and police crossed a line in the run-up to Charter Day was during Baum’s interview with Daniel Marshall, a class of 2015 undergraduate. It’s the recording of that interview that has students and faculty crying intimidation – some faculty have said it’s the most nervous they have seen the administration since the fight over chopping down Redbud Woods in 2005.

The Interview

In a recording of the approximately 15-minute interview provided to media, Baum first tells Marshall he’s “just in the information finding stage” and that he doesn’t “suspect there will be any charges forthcoming, at least from what I’ve been told.”

Baum was trying to gather information about an image posted on the “Save the Pass” Facebook page in the early morning hours of March 26 that shows an image that says “Welcome the Trustees” projected in the Statler Hall auditorium. (Later that day, protesters welcoming Cornell’s trustees followed them inside Statler Hall, where they made a ruckus outside the closed door meeting).

After Marshall declined to answer questions about what he knew of the picture and some butcher paper that was allegedly hung on the walls, Baum changed his tone. He told Marshall he had “subpoenaed” information from Facebook about page organizers, and had the “ability to charge you with a D-felony and two misdemeanors right now.”

“I don’t want to charge you with burglary, I don’t want to ruin your life,” Baum said. “Your cooperation is going to produce that. If you cooperate with me you will not be charged with a burglary. If you don’t cooperate with me I’m going to charge you with a burglary and probably come into one of your classes the next few days and walk you out in handcuffs.”

Once students posted an online “communique” about the incident, faculty got wind and over 100 had signed their names to a brief letter written by associate professor of history Ray Craib that reads in part: “Flat-footed, heavy-handed, offensive: that sums up the actions of the administration and its police force. Is the central administration that insecure?”

Organizing from the top down

“The administration is our best organizer, and now maybe the CUPD is there,” Marshall said. “Over last two years I’d say our numbers have quadrupled or quintupled.”

Many of those active in the #FightTheFee protests this spring got their start in efforts to save freshman bus passes in spring 2014. While the administration says that protests should not be disruptive, and some students critique actions like the sit-in at Day Hall on Feb. 10, Marshall says that was how the bus pass effort was won.

“They kept saying ‘We don’t have the money – and then suddenly one day the money appeared,” Marshall said. “We had about 50 people outside of Day Hall ready to do a sit-in when Skorton came out with Joe Malina and an entire media crew and said the passes were staying.”

Marshall doesn’t think his job as an activist, though, is “to get people riled up.”
“Our role is to connect the dots on how their policies are affecting people,” Marshall said. “There’s this kind of insistence that ‘You’re here to study, we’re here to administrate’ – this isn’t your role. That might be what a lot of students want to do, but policies they’ve been enacting like budget cuts in the arts college, tuition increases that equal about $4,000 over past 2 years … there’s a growing list of things that are threatening students’ abilities to be here.”

Brown also sees the role of campus organizers as connecting the dots.
“We’ve been careful from the beginning to not make (the health care fee) an issue in isolation from everything else,” Brown said. “It’s connected to low-income students who get promised no-loan financial aid, then are forced to take out loans, when their work-study and summer job won’t cut it as part of their expected student contribution.”

Faculty response

“Overkill is the first word that comes to mind,” Craib said of his feeling when he first learned of the investigation. “The students are asking good questions, the same ones faculty have been asking about the deficits. Maybe the jumpiness is coming from the willingness of the students to do their homework on the trustees.”

Eric Cheyfitz, a professor in English, thinks the investigation “violates both the spirit and the letter of what it means to be a part of the community at Cornell.”
“I think it’s a bad mistake, the administration isn’t getting good advice,” Cheyfitz said. “They’re upping the ante in a battle where they can only become more and more alienated from their constituencies.”

There has been speculation that recent budget cuts have something to do with overbuilding, Cheyfitz said, though no one knows for sure. Arts college faculty sent a letter to the administration on April 23 protesting cuts.

“This whole budget crisis has suddenly materialized out of nowhere,” Cheyfitz said. “That means belt tightening across the board. There’s supposed to be consultation with the faculty senate on these matters and that has not been the case.”

Whatever the motivations behind the investigation, there have been calls for a fuller explanation from the administration than the statement released by Cornell police head Kathy Zoner that stated CUPD “was asked to conduct a criminal investigation into alleged felonious behavior” that was not related to the protests on Feb. 10 or March 26.

“The whole community deserves a full explanation from the Cornell police and Cornell administration of what they did and why they did it,” said Risa Lieberwitz, a professor at the Industrial and Labor Relations school. “If it turns out when we hear all the information that it was an overly aggressive action then there should be consequences.”

Hanging With The Mayor & Chief

Originally published in the Ithaca Times on May 20.

Now that tobacco use is nearly as unhip as one-party machine politics, smoke-filled back rooms are a thing of American political history. Back room consultations over coffee, however, are still alive and well, if the “Coffee with the Mayor & Chief” meetings going on in Ithaca are any indication.

The difference between these meetings with Chief John Barber and Mayor Svante Myrick and the typical back room summit is that no one is summoned to attend. Anyone can come into the public space of the coffee shop, sit down, and have a chat with the leaders of their city and police department.
Two more of these sessions are scheduled this spring for the mornings of May 20 and 27 at the Gimme! Coffee on West State Street. Four have been held this spring, three at local Dunkin’ Donuts.

Citizens attending these sessions might want to have a question or two prepared, since the meetings are not an entirely open affair. There is a sign-up system in place with a place to put one’s questions, so the mayor and chief can have one-on-one conversations with their constituents.
Though taking people in by ones or twos doesn’t quite capture the free-ranging marketplace aesthetic of Athenian democracy to which some idealists might aspire, the measure of privacy does allow people to speak a bit more freely about their issues.

For example, on the morning of May 13 a mother speaking with Barber and Myrick wondered how the city could provide more programs for teenagers. She wasn’t excusing some “punk ass shit” her youngster pulled that brought down trouble, but had looked around for mentorship programs to keep older youth, high school-aged, out of trouble and found little. Barber suggested some places she might go, and then Myrick answered her second question – “What are the city’s quality of life goals?”
“Security,” he said first, “so that people can walk down the street without fear.”
The second, Myrick said, was economic security/affordable housing – “I think we’re better than most cities on the first one, and we’re struggling with the second.”

Helen Kuveke, a West Ender, said that she was concerned with people she sees struggling to walk down the street on their own, under the influence of heroin or other substances.
“I can look out my kitchen window and buy any drug I want,” Kuveke said. Treatment and enforcement are the city’s two avenues of action, she was told, – there are no easy answers to an epidemic that’s gripped rural America for the past 20-plus years.

On the topic of affordable housing, Sean Gannon suggested the city look into guaranteeing loans for housing sales, so “Grandma can get the money from a home, and the grandson can get a house he can afford.” The University of Pennsylvania operates a program in Philadelphia that works to get employees into homes in the city they can afford, Gannon told Barber and Myrick.

Arron Bound, a South Sider, came in to pay the IPD a compliment. He’d seen a street fight broken up by officers a few years ago, in a peaceful manner, and said that in his native Cleveland “they would’ve been thrown to the ground and everybody would have been arrested.”
Bound did have a question for the chief: Why does the department buy so many SUVs, compared to sedans? Isn’t gas mileage an issue?
“Really, the mileage is comparable (with sedan cruisers),” Barber said. “They allow us to carry equipment, put a full cage in it, and they’ve got four-wheel-drive which is really helpful.”

The long, morning lines at Gimme! had both the mayor and chief wondering whether that was just the line for java or if they had far more folks waiting to talk. On this morning, over two hours, they had about 15 conversations. Some heavy issues were raised, and some were more of a hello and a chat. Betsy Herrington came by to say hello and give a hug to Myrick, and met Barber for the first time.
“About 1 out of 10 are coming to see me,” Barber said. “Well, no, for the record, let’s say two out of three.”